understanding the importance and impact of anonymity and authentication in a networked society
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Existing and Emerging Privacy-based Limits In Litigation and Electronic Discovery PDF Print
a blog*on*nymity ID TRAIL MIX by Alex Cameron

Privacy law is increasingly important in litigation in Canada. Contemporary litigants routinely file requests for access to their personal information under PIPEDA and its provincial counterparts. Such requests can give a party a partial head-start on litigation discovery, or aid a party in rooting out information held by an opponent or potential opponent.

That said, with some possible room for improvement (at least in the case of PIPEDA), [1] data protection law in Canada takes a relatively hands-off approach when it comes to legal proceedings. Parties in legal proceedings are generally required to disclose information in accordance with long-standing litigation rules and are largely exempted from restrictions that might otherwise be applicable under data protection laws in other contexts. Yet, this does not mean that privacy considerations are not relevant or applicable to discovery in legal proceedings. This short article identifies some existing and emerging privacy-based limits in litigation discovery at the intersection between privacy interests and the need for full disclosure in litigation.

To read the rest of this piece, visit: http://www.anonequity.org/weblog/archives/2007/08/existing_and_emerging_privacyb.php
 
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